College Day UAE

UAE

 

DUBAI, UAE, 14 February 2019 – KDSL Global is launching College Day UAE on 19 February 2019. The goal of College Day UAE is to support students to make an informed college decision, celebrate them for their postsecondary plans, and encourage younger students and families to prepare for college as early as possible. KDSL Global is a USA and UAE-based leading learning organization focused on empowering educators and education businesses globally.

“The idea for College Day UAE began after engaging with primary educators to find out how often they talk about the topic with their students,” said KDSL Global Founder Kevin Simpson.  He found that this was not often a topic of conversation. So the company decided to start a day where schools, educators, families, and the community have these discussions.

KDSL Global is also surveying college counselors based in the United Arab Emirates on college readiness. The results will be available during March 2019. One counselor stated that to be college ready means “Preparing students socially and mentally to essentially step into adulthood at the university/college level. Being able to teach them to be advocates for themselves since their parents should not once they leave for college.” Preliminary results show that:

  • 80% of schools have a college night or college fair
  • 60% of the college nights or fairs are held once a year
  • 20% of talks about college are happening at the primary level

 

Nedra Brown, Secondary & College and Career Counselor at Innoventures Education’s Collegiate American School stated, “College readiness is knowing what to expect in college and how to get there.  It means to know what is being provided for students and having the basic college academic and everyday skills.  When a student graduates from high school and decides to go to college, it is important for them to be prepared and know what is expected.  They need to know how to get into college, SAT, and study habits.”

 

To learn more about College Day UAE, challenges, ideas, how to participate, and more visit https://kdslglobal.wordpress.com/college-day-uae/.

 

KDSL GLOBAL PRESS CONTACT

+971 52 542 7009

Kevin Simpson, kevin@kdslglobal.com

www.kdslglobal.com

 

KDSL Global interviews author and College Success Coach Jahquan Hawkins

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KDSL Global recently had an opportunity to connect with author and College Success Coach Jahquan Hawkins.  Jahquan now serves as the Dean of Student Services at Oakland Community College’s Auburn Hills campus.  He believes in empowering the community by empowering others.

 

What inspired you to focus on higher education?

I’m a product of Detroit Public Schools. I was a first-generation college student who lost two academic scholarships and almost became a casualty of Academic Suspension during my freshman year at Wayne State University. The sacrifices my parents made to ensure that I received a quality education motivated me to right the ship even though I struggled initially.  I was also extremely blessed to have well-intentioned mentors in my life who saw potential in me and consistently invested in my personal and academic success.

Ultimately that experience was the foundation to my career in higher education.  I relish the opportunity to provide the support to this generation of students that so many provided for me when I was finding my way as an undergraduate.  My college journey was life-altering and has opened doors I never imagined I’d be able to enter.  I understand that college isn’t for everyone, but in many ways, it was invaluable to me.

 

Tell us about your newest book.

Donovan’s College Adventure was inspired by the energy and imagination of our “junior citizens.”  I published my first book, Finding My Way, three years ago, and that journey landed me in a multitude of spaces.  I would frequently participate in book fairs that were family oriented and people were bringing children of all ages.  Finding My Way was geared toward college-bound high school students and current college students.  I quickly realized that I didn’t have a book which spoke to the elementary grade audience.  Being the father of a 6-year-old, I’m constantly reading children’s books but I hadn’t read a book that speaks to the journey that connects kids to their career aspirations.

Donovan’s College Adventure introduces kids to the higher education environment through the lens of 5-year-old Donovan Mack.  Donovan is curious, outgoing, and loves to learn.   It’s a fun story that will hopefully help kids understand that attending college is a dynamic experience.  You learn just as much outside of the classroom as you do inside the classroom.  My goal is for kids to embrace the experience as a viable pathway to their success.

 

What can schools and parents do to promote a college going culture?

Early exposure is key.  Parents should be consistently talking about career interests with their children, connecting them with opportunities to meet people who work in those areas, and taking them to the spaces that ultimately will prepare them for their desired career.  There are a number of dual enrollment opportunities for students which allow young people to dip their toes in the water before they decide which higher education experience best suits them.

In my ideal world, we would have a much more fluid relationship between secondary and post-secondary institutions.  K-12 systems should be in regular conversation with colleges and universities about industry trends, articulation with curriculum and mentoring opportunities. Too often, students enter the higher education environment ill-prepared to adjust to the cultural norms.  We must expand upon our partnerships to ensure that this doesn’t happen.  The culture will change when we realize that we need each other in order to be viable for the next 100 years.

 

 

To learn more about Jahquan’s work visit:

https://www.jahquanhawkins.com

https://twitter.com/jahquanhawkins

https://www.amazon.com/Donovans-College-Adventure-Jahquan-Hawkins/dp/1947045237/ref=asc_df_1947045237/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=265892495433&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12163597628235931043&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9060325&hvtargid=pla-617048512209&psc=1

 

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About Jahquan Hawkins

Jahquan Hawkins is a proud husband, father, College Success Coach and native Detroiter. After struggling as a college student himself, Jahquan has experienced a successful career in higher education and now serves as the Dean of Student Services at Oakland Community College’s (OCC) Auburn Hills campus.  Jahquan believes in empowering the community by empowering others.  In 2011, he and a group of college stakeholders helped establish OCC’s Man Up Program which provides higher education exposure opportunities for young men in Southfield Public Schools.  Jahquan is the Co-Director of this dynamic effort which has seen over 300 young men earn transferrable college credit as dual enrollees at the OCC.  In 2016, Jahquan published his first book entitled Finding My Way: A Practical Guide to College Success.  The text has been adopted by institutions such as Harper Woods Schools, Job Corps, and Wayne State University as a mechanism to help students adjust to the culture of the higher education environment.  Most recently, Jahquan was named one of Michigan Chronicle’s 40 under 40 Honorees, joining other community trendsetters in the class of 2018.  Jahquan recently published a children’s book entitled Donovan’s College Adventure.  This latest release is designed to inspire youth to intentionally pursue their dreams through education.  In his spare time, Jahquan volunteers with organizations such as Detroit Kappa League, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and My Brother’s Keeper.

 

 

 

 

Meet our KDSL Global Fellow – Samantha Rodriguez

KDSL Global is pleased to announce our new fellow.  The fellowship focuses on writing, leadership and launching a new education idea.

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Samantha Rodriguez was born and raised in Long Island, New York and graduated from Providence College where she studied Public and Community Service and Political Science. ​Being the first in her family to graduate from college, the value of education was constantly emphasized. Samantha has spent the better part of her life working with youth in different contexts. Since graduating from Providence, Samantha has taught Math in Tsakane, South Africa, was a 9th Grade English Teacher in the South Bronx, has been a College Access Counselor, and is now a Service Learning Program Coordinator for buildOn in Chicago, Illinois. She simultaneously attends graduate school at the University of Illinois at Chicago working towards an MEd in Youth Development. Samantha has always believed that all students are worthy of a strong educational foundation as well as a strong support system that helps them become successful. With her MEd in Youth Development, it is Samantha’s goal to help create spaces that intentionally provide youth with opportunities to develop their interests, skills, and abilities.

 

ABOUT KDSL Global

KDSL Global is a USA and UAE-based leading learning organization focused on empowering educators and education businesses globally. To find out more information visit http://www.kdslglobal.com.

Encouraging students to consider a career in teaching STEM*

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Profile on Julio Mendez: Science teacher, lifelong learner, and founder of the STEM Education Introductory Program

As well as being a busy Physics and Chemistry teacher in Chicago, Julio Mendez has founded the innovative STEM Education Introductory Program – it gives high school students the opportunity to earn college credit through a series of lectures and hands on teaching practice at a local middle school. We ask him all about the project, and how it came about.


You are a science teacher – where do you teach, and what led you down the path of both STEM and teaching?
 

I teach Physics, Chemistry and the Education 101 class at Perspectives Charter School – Joslin Campus, in Chicago’s South Loop neighborhood. I also teach Engineering courses (Project Lead The Way curriculum on Saturdays) through Project SYNCERE. This is a non-profit in Chicago’s Kenwood neighborhood.

Teaching is a second career which found me more due to circumstance than through any active effort. I had returned to school for a Physics degree and was looking for a part time job when my wife suggested I look into Project SYNCERE. I decide to go interview and try it, and the rest is history, as they say. I fell in love with the kids’ ability to look past all the crap they are dealt and still seek knowledge. Having been raised on Chicago’s south side and dealing with a lot of the social issues they are living with made me relatable and my natural sarcastic demeanor and ability to look past slights allowed me to create good relationships with the students. I saw at once that this is where I needed to be and then I just found ways to keep pushing myself to learn, grow and sharpen my craft.

The STEM part is easier to explain: I’m a nerd. I love science and all that it tells us about the universe, I always have. I also understand the need for our communities to be better represented within these fields. We have been neglected for a long time and those who looked away are now realizing that they will need us in order for the world to continue its progress.

 

What inspired you to set up this program encouraging high school students to consider a career as science teachers?

When I was considering become even just a part time teacher, I started looking into the profession and the history of teaching and learning. I came to the realization that education is one of the oldest forms of community building that there is. Until recent human history, we have learned everything from the previous generations in our communities. From hunting and gathering, to planting and growing and so on, we learned it all from our elders, who did it before us and learned it from their elders.

When the opportunity with the Shell Oil Company and the Smithsonian Science Education Center and their call for applications came to my attention I knew the solution had to come from within the community, to create a new lineage of education. There is also a long tradition of finding “fixes” for our communities from outside, as if we hadn’t the talent or abilities to be the solutions ourselves. I have seen our children do some incredible things and come up with some huge ideas that would amaze the greatest thinkers, but because they don’t show high scores or even high rates of high school graduation, their ideas and grand thinking and potentials aren’t acknowledged.  Given all this I knew that the solution to a lack of science teachers of color had to come from our own ranks, the students of color. It was just a matter of convincing the kids they could be the solution and that being a teacher is a viable career (harder than it seems) and convince all the powers that be, this is a viable solution (harder than it should be).

 

Could you describe your aim in setting up the Education 101 program? Who is it designed for and what will they learn?

The biggest aim for the program is to give students of color the opportunity to see themselves as STEM subject teachers. Let them see a side of teaching that they don’t get to see; mostly because they have a very different experience with the teaching profession. They do not have the opportunity to see a lot of themselves in these roles, so they can’t identify with the profession. They just need to see they can and some might.

The students in the class are exposed to the history of education in the country, including the injustices our communities have gone through, the  definition of what a STEM teacher needs to be, exposure to informal science education, observing teachers, the complexity of the classroom, the preparation for lessons, reading and writing college level papers. This will be set around Socratic discussions and group projects that will be catered to the students’ abilities and raising expectations at every turn.

Was the creation of your program partly in response to the lack of diversity found in the teaching profession?

The creation of the program most definitely has to do with the lack of diversity in teaching. It is very difficult to be a teacher of color within a system which serves mostly students of color and yet we are an overwhelming numerical minority, especially in the STEM subjects.

 

A Student’s Perspective: Here’s what one of the course participants, Jada Woodard, has to say about the Program

Why did you apply?

I applied to the Education 101 course because I am thinking about being an educator. I thought it would give me the upper hand when I do attend college to study education. In addition, I wanted to find out if it was really something that I wanted to do.

What’s the best thing about the course?
The best thing about the course is that I am able to learn about the previous educational system, the current educational system, and the future of the educational system. I love that I am able to give my perspective as a student while learning the perspective of a teacher. We are able to talk about topics within the educational system that others aren’t willing to talk about, students of colors and teachers.

What’s the hardest part of the course?
The hardest thing about the course is actually putting yourself in the shoes of an educator. My student mindset slightly limits my ability to think like an educator. It is something that we as a class are working on to do.

What are you learning right now?
At the moment, we are learning how to effectively make lesson plans. In a month or sooner, we will able to teach this lesson plan/activity to a middle school class using the five aspects of an effective classroom that we have learned.
I think the reason there are not many STEM teachers of color is because of the lack of knowledge and resources. I think that in some schools STEM is a luxury. Although we do get taught science and math, it’s not taught or introduced in a way that makes it relevant to engineering and technology.

 

To learn more about the STEM Education Introductory Program contact Julio Mendez at jmendez@pcsedu.org.

 

*STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math