KDSL Global Fellows 2019

KDSL Global, based in the United Arab Emirates and in the United States, is pleased to announce our new fellows.  The fellowship will run from January-December 2019 with a focus on writing, leadership, and launching a new education idea.

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Octevia Torian is from Virginia and has 14 years of experience in the education field. In the past she has served as an instructional coach, advisor and advanced academics resource teacher. Currently, Octevia is in her second year of teaching in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates with a focus on the Next Generation Science Standards, Project-Based Learning, STEM, and teaching science at the middle school level.  She loves to bring real life experiences to the classroom for students and takes pleasure in seeing learners engaged in the classroom and applying their knowledge to everyday life. Octevia is a lifelong learner who is a member of professional development organizations such as ASCD and presents at education conferences. One of her latest projects involves initiating a pilot program at her school with Global Air Media, LLC. This program uses STEM curriculum to teach students about drone technology and entrepreneurship in the 21st century. At her school she leads a YouTube Club for students, a talk show for teachers, and is a co-host for a podcast called Dismissed.  She is a graduate from Averett University, Capella University, and Virginia Commonwealth University.

 

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Sania Green-Reynolds is a Jamaican native who is living her dream of experiencing and contributing to education on a global level. She is an experienced and dynamic English teacher, curriculum, teaching and learning support expert, and believer. Sania has been teaching for 16 years (pre-training) and 11 years (post-training). She’s taught students (face to face) in Jamaica and the Caribbean, Japan, the United Arab Emirates and students of other nationalities in online forums, and hosts  personal and professional development workshops as well as speak at regional and international conferences. Over the years she has received various awards in education, which speak to her innovative and skilled approach to teaching and progressive student learning.

Sania is a best-selling co-author and a writer who has contributed to several international publications. She has been an inspiration to her students and colleagues alike. One of her books, The Self-Confidence Booster, was translated to Japanese to provide further inspiration and motivation to her students in Japan whom she believed could speak English more fluently if they were confident enough to do so. Sania has been awarded different awards such as English Teacher of the Month, Most Innovative English Teacher, Education Journal Middle East Teacher of the Week and recognized as the teacher with the highest NWEA MAP progress and attainment in her past school.

She believes in giving back to the community. As demonstrated by her work in community improvement and social work in education, which spans from the Caribbean to Africa and as a result, she is honored to be a Walden University Scholar of Change Awardee. She holds a 3-year Diploma in English Language and Literature Education, a B.Ed. in Elementary Education with 1st Class Honors, Certificates in TEFL, Supervisory Management and Coaching, and a M.S.Ed. In Educational Leadership and Administration with Honors.

 

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Our KDSL Global Fellow at FLIBS

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The International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme is a VERY rigorous programme for scholars at select primary and secondary schools. This programme’s international component is unique, but in a way that can be beneficial for today’s learners. This program has intentionally modeled the standard college experience. After the completion of this program, scholars earn advanced college credits and have the potential for scholarships. After receiving an invitation to be sent to training with the Florida Association of IB World Schools (FLIBS), there was no way I could decline. In this blog post I will share with you my recent experience.

The first day of training was the most beneficial for me. This day was used for opening the floor for questions from my group. Our instructor would address each of our main concerns about the curriculum of IB. I have to make one small disclaimer as to why this worked for my group. The biology group was a small one, consisting of seven educators. This was the best part for me! It allowed the instructor to be more personal with our questions, comments, and concerns, which made it a more engaging and valuable. I’m sure that most people who love their content felt eager to expand their professional development making day one the most exciting. Day two was spent breaking down the three core elements that every scholar has to show mastery on in order to obtain the diploma. The three core elements are Theory of knowledge (TOK), extended essay (EE), and creativity, activity, and service, which is often referred to as CAS. The three core elements are similar to what you would see in college. For example, when I was a biology major during university the only “papers” I had to write were in my general education classes. My life was creating a schedule for myself to finish labs and the reports that went with them. Congruently, this is what an IB scholar would experience in their science content course. If you are immersed in the world of IB, then time management and organization is imperative. As per my instructor, not often does IB request certain material from you, but if you are audited, it is best to keep documentation on what is happening in your class. Day three was a half day to recap on anything that may have been unclear and to tie everything we had learned together in a way we can feel confident to implement IB practices in our classroom this fall.

Overall, I had a great experience at training! My instructor did a phenomenal job of pacing, integrating hands-on tasks, and clarity of explaining which really made me want to be invited into his classroom. In the future I hope to return to FLIBS for level 2-3 training.

 

Tiffany Johnson
9th Grade Biology Teacher
KDSL Global Fellow
Website: www.kdslglobal.com
Twitter: @KDSL07 and @sayscienceTEM

Teachers Supporting Teachers

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At Teachers Supporting Teachers they believe that the students of Chicago deserve an excellent education, and that begins with our teachers.

 

Our KDSL Global Fellow Tiffany Johnson recently attended the TST Spring Elite Teacher Leader Networking Session in Chicago.  One aspect of the fellowship includes attending and creating leadership opportunities in your local context. Below is her reflection.

I’m writing this because the past event put together by Teachers Supporting Teachers (TST) was an opportunity that no Chicago educator should not have missed. I left feeling inspired from spending a day networking with some of the top educators in the city. But, I want to assure you that the founders of Teachers Supporting Teachers will be hosting more events that I recommend you attend. The location of the event was in the Willis (Sears to the old school Chicagoans) Tower where about 60 people in the field of education congregated. There were three breakout sessions that everyone had the opportunity to attend. All of these sessions were interactive and most importantly all focused on leadership. At the end of the event, TST mentioned that they are available for 1:1 mentoring with schools, which is something that many people, including myself, showed interest in. In the future, I recommend you attend any event TST puts together, because you will meet a variety of resource rich people.

 

To learn more about Teachers Supporting Teachers visit http://tstnfp.org/

 

 

Closing the STEM Gap

A new study called “Closing the STEM Gap” published in March 2018 by Microsoft surveyed more than 6,000 girls and young women on their interests and perceptions of science, technology, engineering and math. They found that girls lose interest in STEM careers as they get older. What can be done? The study cited recommendations to change this narrative. This included: role models and mentors, exposure to real-world examples of STEM, hands-on experience through participation in STEM-related clubs and activities, and encouragement from parents and educators could.

Our KDSL Global Fellow Tiffany Johnson recently interviewed one of her students to find out her perception about STEM after attending Interactive STEM Development Seminar for Underrepresented Students hosted by the Woods Educational Enrichment Foundation in Chicago. This was an additional program Johnson, who is implementing the recommendations in the study, suggested to her students.

This purpose of the seminar was to introduce and expose students to STEM career options and provide hands on experience with real world topics and projects leading to the development of the students as future leaders in the STEM fields.

 

What are your feelings about STEM?

“I feel like STEM is great for all kinds of people.  It allows you to dive more in depth about the world, technology, etc.”

 

Do you see yourself as a person who would pursue a career in the STEM field? If so, which field and why?

“Yes, I see myself pursuing a career in sciences, specifically psychology or sociology, becaucareese I like to study the functions of the brain, the actions of humans, and why people do the things they do.”

 

What did you do at the STEM event you attended?

“At the event, I had to design a functional hand using cardboard, sticks, tape, and string.  I also made slime.  The instructors that were there were African American men who knew a GREAT deal about STEM.”

 

How would you describe your feeling about STEM? Are you intimidated? Do you feel like you would be supported as you pursue a career in this field?

“I am supported greatly by my family and different teachers who push me to join the STEM field.  My feelings towards the STEM field are that I think it offers different opportunities to different types of people to work in an advanced field.  Also, I feel like being a part of this field, I would be able to represent African-Americans in a positive way.”

 

To learn more about Woods Educational Enrichment Foundation visit https://www.weefchicago.org/

 

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Meet Janessa, a high school scholar interested in STEM and recent participant in the Woods Educational Enrichment Foundation in Chicago.

Meet our KDSL Global Fellow – Samantha Rodriguez

KDSL Global is pleased to announce our new fellow.  The fellowship focuses on writing, leadership and launching a new education idea.

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Samantha Rodriguez was born and raised in Long Island, New York and graduated from Providence College where she studied Public and Community Service and Political Science. ​Being the first in her family to graduate from college, the value of education was constantly emphasized. Samantha has spent the better part of her life working with youth in different contexts. Since graduating from Providence, Samantha has taught Math in Tsakane, South Africa, was a 9th Grade English Teacher in the South Bronx, has been a College Access Counselor, and is now a Service Learning Program Coordinator for buildOn in Chicago, Illinois. She simultaneously attends graduate school at the University of Illinois at Chicago working towards an MEd in Youth Development. Samantha has always believed that all students are worthy of a strong educational foundation as well as a strong support system that helps them become successful. With her MEd in Youth Development, it is Samantha’s goal to help create spaces that intentionally provide youth with opportunities to develop their interests, skills, and abilities.

 

ABOUT KDSL Global

KDSL Global is a USA and UAE-based leading learning organization focused on empowering educators and education businesses globally. To find out more information visit http://www.kdslglobal.com.

STEMCON 2018

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Our KDSL Global Fellow Tiffany Johnson recently attended the STEMCON conference in Chicago, Illinois. STEMCON is a platform for STEM educators and administrators from all around the nation to share their best practices. Below is a reflection on her experience as a first time participant.

Year after year, STEMCON is where all STEM educators want to be. Just to put things into perspective, STEMCON is like the Coachella for all things STEM. From the moment I walked in, I knew I was in the presence of greatness. Upon arrival, I noticed Dr. Carolyn Hayes, the former president of National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), sitting amongst several of her colleagues. I was instantly star-struck! After setting my obnoxiously large teacher bag down, I wasted no time to introduce myself to Dr. Hayes. Dr. Hayes has an energetic personality that is highly contagious and seeing a woman achieve the “Lifetime STEM Leadership” award was very inspirational. After breakfast & coffee, the stage was graced with the first female civilian Afghan-American pilot and the youngest female pilot to fly solo around the world in a single-engine aircraft, Shaesta Waiz. Ms. Waiz has an amazing story, and a unique purpose that motivates her in the work that she does.

After breakfast, there were numerous breakout sessions that I attended throughout the day, such as Innovative Ways to Sustain STEM Interest and Career Paths for Girls, Bringing the Outside In: Making an Ecosystem in a Bottle, and last but not least, How Hip-Hop Music and Culture can Bridge the STEM Gap for Underrepresented Populations. There was not enough time for me to attend all the sessions, but I did make connections with the presenters of the sessions I did not attend.

Being a person of color in STEM, I am constantly questioning myself about how do I influence students that look like me, to be like me. At STEMCON I was exposed to many different versions of what STEM looks like for different people. One of the sessions I attended talked about connecting STEM to the culture of Hip-Hop and broke down the science behind the movement. After getting the opportunity to bounce ideas off of the presenters, Darlyne de Haan and Damiso Josey, we agreed to continue the conversation even after the event and beyond!

I departed STEMCON feeling inspired, educated, connected, and supported which are all the reasons why I would recommend this conference to anyone in STEM.

P.S. – Among the many lessons I learned at STEMCON, one of the top lessons I learned was don’t be afraid to ask people for a picture! This is the only picture I have of myself at STEMCON. Thanks to the photographer.

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Tiffany Johnson learning more about STEM.

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Dr. Carolyn Hayes receiving the Lifetime STEM Leadership Award.

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Shaesta Waiz, the first female civilian Afghan-American pilot and the youngest female pilot to fly solo around the world in a single-engine aircraft

 

To learn more about Tiffany visit https://kdslglobal.wordpress.com/2018/03/05/kdsl-global-fellows-2/ and STEMCON visit www.stemcon.net.

 

 

 

Five Highlights from the Global Education & Skills Forum 2018

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This week marked the sixth annual global education and skills forum; an initiative by the Varkey Foundation where education practitioners, policy makers and distinguished members of international organizations get together to discuss pressing issues in global education. This year’s theme was how to prepare learners today for 2030 and beyond. This year, entrepreneurship was highlighted via the Next Billion EdTech Prize where initiatives in education from around the globe were featured for the work and change they try to make in global education. On behalf of the KDSL Global team, I attended this year’s forum and got to engage in interesting conversations with some of the speakers and delegates from around the world. If you didn’t make it to the forum this year, no worries! Here are some common insights we observed emerging among speakers and sessions:

1.   The Incorporation of Augmented and Virtual Reality in Pedagogy Design Should Be Prioritized:

Not limited to STEM, AR and VR should be part of today’s learning. Immersive learning, in order to be effective, should aim for exposing students to digital storytelling as a step forward to teaching empathy and global citizenship. Such technologies, then, need to be looked as a learning experience rather than a tool in order to reach the desired outcomes of 2030. Teachers and school leaders should plan for professional development experiences that support envisioning teaching in light with EdTech. Here is an interesting article you might want to read on the topic, and if you are wondering how the future in emerging economies would look like, you might want to join Mr. Fiebeg; the Co-Founder of Coders Trust in a virtual journey here.

2.   The Role of Socio-emotional Intelligence in Promoting Innovation and Well-being:

Almost all sessions pressed on that education should aim for preparing independent empathetic learners who are empowered with skills and attitudes that are core to solving local and global issues. With the skills gap that employers have reported in several studies, fresh graduates seem to lack the soft skills that enable them to be innovative and more understanding of the global market’s needs. For that, many speakers stressed the importance for paying more attention to emotional intelligence in school communities. I personally enjoyed this session on teaching young people empathy and why it is needed now.

To read the complete post from our KDSL Global Teacher Fellow Hiba Ibrahim visit
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/five-highlights-from-global-education-skills-forum-2018-hiba-ibrahim/

KDSL Global Fellows

KDSL Global, based in the United Arab Emirates and in the United States, is pleased to announce our new fellow.  The fellowship will run for one year with a focus on writing, leadership and launching a new education idea.

 

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Tiffany Johnson was born in Chicago and raised in the south suburbs where she attended Homewood-Flossmoor High School.  After graduation, she attended Illinois State University and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. During her time there, Tiffany joined The Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation, which was an organization that linked her with minorities in the STEM fields and awarded her scholarships and mentorship opportunities. Her interest in teaching began in high school and carried her away to her favorite place, New York!  Tiffany taught 6th grade science to a group of brilliant boys in the historic neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant (Bed-Stuy) Brooklyn. She is excited to return back to her roots in Chicago where she teaches 9th grade Biology in the south side neighborhood of Auburn Gresham.  She looks forward to bringing her skills to ensure there is a strong culture of achievement and a fearless interest in the STEM fields.  In her spare time, Tiffany enjoys traveling, Netflix, reading, and spending time with her son and friends.